Thursday

Why The Oscars Don't Mean Anything Anymore

The Academy-Awards are heading down a long and lonesome road.... the road to become a meaningless award.

Award shows are meaning less everyday. The MTV video awards, whom when I was a kid were one of the biggest events of the year - filling up entire theaters, were last held in what looked to be like my high school gymnasium with nice lights. The Grammys, which also used to be an honor to musicians, are almost completely arbitrary. Not a single person I know cares about who wins a Grammy.

And this is happening to the Oscars.

Why, you ask? Because where the Grammys decided to award only the most popular, the Oscars have done the opposite- becoming more and more elitist. My chief example of this lies with the fact that "The Dark Knight" did not receive a Best Picture nomination, even though it is the second highest grossing movie of all time only to "Titanic" which won 11 Golden Statues. And who got the nomination instead? The Reader; I mean, come on.
But that's not the worst part. Even in it's elitism, the Oscars still don't choose by merit. They are decided by multi-million dollar marketing campaigns paid for by the studio- not by who should be nominated, but by who can pay to get our attention.
Now, part of this might rest of the fact that in the last 10 years filmmaking has become extremely more accessible to the point where almost anyone can put together a movie. This has increased the amount of films made, and therefore makes it harder to the Academy to see and judge all of them. And much like the Grammys, this influx lets the people with the most money or power win because they can get people to see it.
If you made the best film ever, in your own backyard right now, I doubt it'll ever been recognized by the Academy. You'd have to get it made by a studio, and that studio will have to spend millions sending copies to every member of the academy, and release it in certain cities at certain times and get you on the news- for you to even get a nod.

Bullshit, right?

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